Sunday, November 30, 2014

Links for November

Here is a really nice article about someone's project putting some smarts on a model plane.  The author explains things well and does the whole multi-media thing very well.

This is one scary chemical reaction.

For a while Hong Kong had a block that was essentially a lawless zone backed full of people regardless of any sort of zoning.  Here's an awesome cross section someone put together of it.

The roundworm c. elegans is remarkable for being the creature with the world's most studied nervous system.  Which was relatively easy since it only has a few hundred neurons.  Well, some scientists simulated those neurons and put them in a robot body.  Uploading here we come!

Boston is apparently in the running for the 2024 Olympics.  I hope we don't end up hosting it.

Many people have complained that Indian Jones isn't a very good archeologist but Max Gladstone weighs in to support him.

Apparently humans and dolphins can hunt fish together!

Our CTO's solar van.

For a long time I've been a sort of semi-pesca-pollotarian, which is to say that I try not to eat the meat of my fellow mammals when it's easy to do so.  Someone has done the math on how many animals it takes to supply the meat you eat and my takeaway is that I should probably eat more turkey.

I've always had mixed feelings about the Affordable Care Act.  On one hand it looks like an improvement in various areas and it ought to help get more people medical care.  On the other hand, it's very complicated and looked like it was deliberately obfuscated to conceal how much it was going to cost.  Well, apparently it's main architect went and said that yes, this was why it was written that way.  I appreciate that he felt that what he did was necessary but I still don't approve of those tactics.  This also doesn't reflect well on our journalists.

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